Keynotes

 

 

Reconfigurable Computing and the von Neumann Syndrome

Reiner Hartenstein, Kaiserslautern University, Germany

http://hartenstein.de

 

About the Speaker

  Dr. Reiner Hartenstein currently is professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Kaiserslautern University. He received all his academic degrees from the EE Department at Karlsruhe University, where he later became Associate Professor of Computer Science. Before joining Kaiserslautern he has worked in character recognition, image processing, digital and hybrid circuits and systems, computer architecture, microprogramming, and high level hardware description language. At Kaiserslautern he worked on computer structures, high level hardware description languages and on VLSI design methods and tools. Since about ten years Prof. Hartenstein and his group also works on reconfigurable computing and related compilation techniques. The achievements of his group are supported by various funding agencies. Prof. Hartenstein, Senior Member of the IEEE and FPL fellow, organized numerous international workshops and conferences. Many times Prof. Hartenstein has been invited to international conferences as an invited speaker, keynote speaker, embedded tutorial speaker, and as a panelist. He has authored, co-authored or co-edited 14 books and more than 350 papers.

 

Summary

  Arthur Schopenhauer wrote: "Approximately every 30 years, we declare the scientific, literary and artistic spirit of the age bankrupt. In time, the accumulation of errors collapses under the absurdity of its own weight." However, mesmerized by the Gordon Moore Curve, we in computer science slowed down our own learning curve. Finally, after 60 years, we are witnessing the collapse of the spirit of the Mainframe Age. Heralded by numerous success stories of software to FPGA migrations, and, by the announcement of many-core microprocessors, disruptive technologies are guiding us to new horizons of affordable very high performance computing. The personal supercomputer is near. But we will have to pay a high price. For removing educational deficits we will have to question the fundamental mind set of application development. We need new qualifications and new programming tools following a dual-paradigm approach.

 

 

RSM-based Gossip on P2P Network

Hai Zhuge, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

http://www.knowledgegrid.net/~h.zhuge

 

About the Speaker

         

  Hai Zhuge is the chief scientist of the China Semantic Grid project funded by the National Basic Research Program of China.  He is a professor and the director of the Key Lab of Intelligent Information Processing at the Institute of Computing Technology in Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the founder of the China Knowledge Grid Research Group (http://kg.ict.ac.cn).  He was the keynote speaker of many international conferences like WAIM, ASWC and ICEC.  He initiates the International Conference on Semantics, Knowledge and Grid (www.knowledgegrid.net).  He is serving as the Area Editor of the Journal of Systems and Software and the Associate Editor of Future Generation Computer Systems.  His monograph The Knowledge Grid is the first book in the area.  His publications also appeared in leading periodicals such as Communications of the ACM, IEEE Computer, and IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering.  Some were top 1 highly cited according to ISI Essential Science Indicator.  He was the top scholar in the systems and software engineering area (1999-2004) according to the assessment report of the Journal of Systems and Software.  He is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of ACM.   More information is available at his website: http://www.knowledgegrid.net/~h.zhuge/

 

Summary

  Classification is a kind of basic semantics that people often use to manage versatile contents in daily life. Resource Space Model (RSM) is a semantic model for sharing and managing various resources using normalized classification semantics. Gossip-based peer-to-peer (P2P) techniques are reliable and scalable protocols for information dissemination. Incorporating RSM with Gossip-based techniques can synergy normalization and autonomy and forms a mechanism for improving the performance of unstructured peer-to-peer systems. Theoretical analysis and experiments validate the feasibility of the mechanism.   This keynote will also introduce the Resource Space Model and Its applications.